Region 4 Child Care Resource and Referral

Child Care Resource and Referral agencies deliver an interrelated set of “core” services to families, child care providers, and communities. CCR&R Core services include:

  • Consumer Education and Referral
  • Professional Development
  • Technical Assistance
  • Data Collection, Analysis and Dissemination
  • Public Awareness

CCR&R Core services address four major areas which include:

  • Support families and the child care system by gathering supply and demand data to help improve their local early education/school-age system.
  • Equip families with consumer education materials to assist them in their search for child care.
  • Assist those interested in starting a child care program or in enhancing their current program operation
  • Facilitate the development of pathways to higher education for the early childhood workforce.
  • Provide training and technical assistance to child care providers. Maintain and use a child care/early care and education database, to document child care needs and gaps.
  • Play a key role in informing the public and affecting child care policy; and
  • Acts as a partner in community planning for early care and education.

Region 4 Child Care Resource and Referral Services provide all services in an unbiased manner with regard to race, ethnicity, gender, religion, handicap and national origin.

SUMMER SAFETY TIPS

Being safe in the summer does not mean staying indoors all day long! Children need fresh air, exercise, and outdoor play throughout the year. The NC Child Care Rules .0509(d) require that facilities take children outdoors every day that “weather conditions permit”. In the summer storms or a heat index at or above 90 º F pose significant health risks (Caring For Our Children: National Health and Safety Performance Standard 2.009).

SUN SAFETY

Use good judgment and help children develop sun safe habits.

  • Limit sun exposure during the hottest part of the day, between 10 AM and 4 PM.
  • Apply sunscreen, 15 SPH or higher, to children’s exposed skin, thirty minutes before going out. Get written permission from the parents to use sunscreen.
  • Dress children in lightweight clothing that covers the skin and broad brimmed hats to protect them from overexposure. Have children wear sunglasses with 100% UV protection.
  • Provide shade (trees, shade structures, awnings, tarps) so adults and children can enjoy more time outdoors.

YOUNG BODIES ON THE MOVE

Physical activity teaches children:

  • Where their bodies are in relationship to the space around them.
  • How their bodies move and how much effort it takes to jump, run, crawl or bend.
  • To trust their bodies and their ability to solve physical challenges.

When setting up the environment children’s safety should always be the first thing to consider. Uncluttered open areas and pathways allow all children to move freely. They do not have to worry about tripping over toys or bumping into each other. A safe open environment encourages physical activity.

“To stimulate creativity, one must develop the childlike inclination for play and the childlike desire for recognition” ~Albert Einstein

  • Infants need a safe space, protected from mobile toddlers and preschoolers, where they can stretch, kick, and crawl.
  • Toddlers need a safe area where they can practice walking, and develop balance and large muscle coordination.
  • Preschoolers have loads of energy and are more physically adept. They need space for running, climbing, jumping, and for stretching, bending and playing active games.

When planning and scheduling activities, providers should remember that children:

  • Should never be inactive for more than one hour at a time, unless they are sleeping.
  • With physical disabilities may need adaptive equipment such as walkers, braces, crutches or other special supports to help them move and participate in activities.
  • Need to engage in a wide array of activities each day to master different physical skills and to develop flexibility, strength and endurance.

Providers can join in the fun!

  • Walk, run and skip with the children for an aerobic workout!
  • Lead children in stretching and bending exercises to increase flexibility!
  • Lift, climb and throw balls with children to build strength!

When adults encourage children and enthusiastically join in activities, they help to instill a love of physical activity. Seeing providers enjoying the fun helps children develop a positive attitude towards physical activity and gives providers a chance to get some of the exercise they need to stay, or become, fit and healthy!

BABIES ON THE MOVE!

There is no minimum or maximum amount of time recommended for infants to be physically active. Infants should have many opportunities each day to move freely.

  • Infants should not be confined to cribs or strollers for more than a few minutes after they wake up or come back from their stroll.
  • Activities should match each baby’s abilities.
  • Activities should be brought to infants who are not mobile.
  • Infants who are able to sit independently or are mobile can get to the toys they want to play with.

Promoting Healthy Social Behaviors in Child Care Centers
Help is available for child care providers who care for children with challenging behaviors.

Promoting Healthy Social Behaviors in Child Care Centers is an initiative of the NC Resource and Referral Council, funded by the NC DCD. Behavior specialists are available to every county in North Carolina. They can visit regulated child care centers and observe children. They will work with child care providers to develop strategies to reduce and prevent challenging behaviors in the classroom. They can suggest new approaches to try to make classrooms calmer and
happier places. They offer training statewide for families and for caregivers who work at home or in centers.

For information contact Jesse Norris: (910) 642-8189 or 800-653-5212, ext. 22 or jnorris@21enjoy.com.

INFANT/TODDLER ENHANCEMENT PROJECT

Did you know that more growth and development takes place during the first three years of life than at any other time? NC’s Infant/Toddler Enhancement Project can help you improve the quality of the care you provide for your youngest children.
For information contact Linda King: (910) 642-8189 or 800-653-5212, ext. 24 or lking@21enjoy.com.

NC SCHOOL-AGE PROJECT

The School-age Specialist is available to help you arrange and furnish your school age classrooms with appropriate materials and experiences to engage your older children’s interests and learning.
For information about the School-age Project contact Mary Miller: (910) 642-8189 or 800-653-5212, ext. 23 or mmiller@21enjoy.com.

Teaching Caring Behaviors in Groups

  • In child care, plan a group time to allow each child to share and build a sense of community with his or her peers.
  • Plan group rules that include sticking together, no hurts, and having fun.
  • Say something positive about each child every day.
  • Midday circle time can help children to regroup and will allow children to tell what they have been doing during the morning.
  • Children who help plan their learning and choose their own activities will feel more in control, and they will feel more competent.
  • Plan transitions. Music, finger play, and poems can be signals to change activities smoothly.
  • Really listen when children speak. Seek to understand the message behind their words.

Reference: DeBord, Karen (2000), Childhood Aggression: Where Does It Come From? How Can It Be Managed? www.nncc.org/Child.Dev/aggression.html.

CONSUMER EDUCATION AND REFERRAL

Choosing child care is one of the most important decisions families make. To help parents take the guess out of choosing child care, free referrals, not recommendations, are provided to local child care providers, information on state licensing requirements, availability of child care subsidies, information about child development and a wide variety of parenting and community resources.

LOOKING FOR CHILD CARE

We do not guarantee the accuracy of the information concerning any person in our files. We do not license, endorse, or recommend any particular program, nor do we ensure quality of care given by any program.

Call 1-800-653-5212 for our customized referral service. The information requested in order to assist customers searching for child care is used only for the purpose of providing child care referrals and collecting statistical information concerning child care needs to better serve the community.

All personal or identifying information will remain confidential and will not be released to anyone outside of Region 4 CCR&R Services without written consent.

Region 4 CCR&R Services coordinates the following quality improvement initiatives for Bladen, Brunswick, Columbus, Duplin, New Hanover, Pender and Sampson Counties.

Child Care Providers — please contact us at puzzlestraining@gmail.com or (910) 642-8189 to inform us of updates to your profile.

INFANT/TODDLER ENHANCEMENT PROJECT

Provides technical assistance for child care providers caring for infants and toddlers in Region 4. This is a free service offered by NC Division of Child Development for caregivers desiring to improve the quality of care they provide.

PROMOTING HEALTHY SOCIAL BEHAVIORS PROJECT

Provides assistance to child care providers and programs that care for young children with challenging behaviors. This is a free service to child care providers and programs within Region 4.

SCHOOL-AGE QUALITY IMPROVEMENT PROJECT

Offers services to improve the availability and quality of licensed school-age care in Region 4 service area. All services are free.

Region 4 Professional Development Workshops and Training are made available to help child care providers increase their early childhood skills and education, resulting in higher quality care for the young children of this region. A variety of professional development workshops are offered each month for early care and education and school-age child care professionals.

After finding a workshop or training you would like to take, download and print a registration form. Mail it with payment to the Southeastern Child Care Resource and Referral office to the address listed on the form. Please allow ample time for the registration form to be in the CCR&R office three days before the scheduled training date.

Summer Safety Tips

Being safe in the summer does not mean staying indoors all day long! Children need fresh air, exercise, and outdoor play throughout the year. The NC Child Care Rules .0509(d) require that facilities take children outdoors every day that “weather conditions permit”. In the summer storms or a heat index at or above 90 º F pose significant health risks (Caring For Our Children: National Health and Safety Performance Standard 2.009).

Sun Safety

Use good judgment and help children develop sun safe habits.

  • Limit sun exposure during the hottest part of the day, between 10 AM and 4 PM.
  • Apply sunscreen, 15 SPH or higher, to children’s exposed skin, thirty minutes before going out. Get written permission from the parents to use sunscreen.
  • Dress children in lightweight clothing that covers the skin and broad brimmed hats to protect them from over exposure. Have children wear sunglasses with 100% UV protection.
  • Provide shade (trees, shade structures, awnings, tarps) so adults and children can enjoy more time outdoors.

Young Bodies on the Move

Physical activity teaches children:

  • Where their bodies are in relationship to the space around them.
  • How their bodies move and how much effort it takes to jump, run, crawl or bend.
  • To trust their bodies and their ability to solve physical challenges.

When setting up the environment, children’s safety should always be the first thing to consider. Uncluttered open areas and pathways allow all children to move freely. They do not have to worry about tripping over toys or bumping into each other. A safe open environment encourages physical activity.

“To stimulate creativity, one must develop the childlike inclination for play and the childlike desire for recognition” ~Albert Einstein

  • Infants need a safe space, protected from mobile toddlers and preschoolers, where they can stretch, kick, and crawl.
  • Toddlers need a safe area where they can practice walking, and develop balance and large muscle coordination.
  • Preschoolers have loads of energy and are more physically adept. They need space for running, climbing, jumping, and for stretching, bending and playing active games.

When planning and scheduling activities, providers should remember that children:

  • Should never be inactive for more than one hour at a time, unless they are sleeping.
  • With physical disabilities may need adaptive equipment such as walkers, braces, crutches or other special supports to help them move and participate in activities.
  • Need to engage in a wide array of activities each day to master different physical skills and to develop flexibility, strength and endurance.

Providers can join in the fun!

  • Walk, run and skip with the children for an aerobic workout!
  • Lead children in stretching and bending exercises to increase flexibility!
  • Lift, climb and throw balls with children to build strength!

When adults encourage children and enthusiastically join in activities, they help to instill a love of physical activity. Seeing providers enjoying the fun helps children develop a positive attitude towards physical activity and gives providers a chance to get some of the exercise they need to stay, or become, fit and healthy!

Babies on the Move!

There is no minimum or maximum amount of time recommended for infants to be physically active. Infants should have many opportunities each day to move freely.

  • Infants should not be confined to cribs or strollers for more than a few minutes after they wake up or come back from their stroll.
  • Activities should match each baby’s abilities.
  • Activities should be brought to infants who are not mobile.
  • Infants who are able to sit independently or are mobile can get to the toys they want to play with.

Promoting Healthy Social Behaviors in Child Care Centers

Help is available for child care providers who care for children with challenging behaviors. Promoting Healthy Social Behaviors in Child Care Centers is an initiative of the NC Resource and Referral Council, funded by the NC DCD. Behavior specialists are available to every county in North Carolina. They can visit regulated child care centers and observe children. They will work with child care providers to develop strategies to reduce and prevent challenging behaviors in the classroom. They can suggest new approaches to try to make classrooms calmer and happier places. They offer training statewide for families and for caregivers who work at home or in centers.

For information contact Jesse Norris: (910) 642-8189 or 800-653-5212, ext. 22 or jnorris@21enjoy.com.

Infant/Toddler Enhancement Project

Did you know that more growth and development takes place during the first three years of life than at any other time? NC’s Infant/Toddler Enhancement Project can help you improve the quality of the care you provide for your youngest children.
For information contact Linda King: (910) 642-8189 or 800-653-5212, ext. 24 or lking@21enjoy.com.

NC School-Age Project

The School-age Specialist is available to help you arrange and furnish your school-age classrooms with appropriate materials and experiences to engage your older children’s interests and learning.
For information about the School-age Project contact Mary Miller: (910) 642-8189 or 800-653-5212, ext. 23 or mmiller@21enjoy.com.

Teaching Caring Behaviors in Groups

  • In child care, plan a group time to allow each child to share and build a sense of community with his or her peers.
  • Plan group rules that include sticking together, no hurts, and having fun.
  • Say something positive about each child every day.
  • Midday circle time can help children to regroup and will allow children to tell what they have been doing during the morning.
  • Children who help plan their learning and choose their own activities will feel more in control, and they will feel more competent.
  • Plan transitions. Music, finger play, and poems can be signals to change activities smoothly.
  • Really listen when children speak. Seek to understand the message behind their words.

Reference: DeBord, Karen (2000), Childhood Aggression: Where Does It Come From? How Can It Be Managed? www.nncc.org/Child.Dev/aggression.html.

Provides technical assistance for child care providers caring for infants and toddlers in Region 4. This is a free service offered by NC Division of Child Development for caregivers desiring to improve the quality of care they provide. The Infant/Toddler Specialist can provide:

  • On-site consultation
  • Workshops on infant/toddler – related topics
  • ITS-SIDS Training – NC Division of Child Development required training
  • Room arrangement suggestions

For more information, contact Linda King, Infant/Toddler Specialist.

Social emotional development refers to the developing capacity of infants and toddlers to:

  • Form close and secure relationships
  • Experience, regulate, and express emotions
  • Explore the environment and learn

Responsive caregiving is critical to healthy social emotional development. Healthy social emotional development is critical to school readiness. According to The Heart Start Report, there is a “school literacy” more basic than knowledge of numbers and letters. The 7 characteristics that are most closely associated with school success involve social emotional competency:

  • Confidence
  • Curiosity
  • Intentionality
  • Self-control
  • Relatedness
  • Capacity to communicate
  • Cooperativeness

Give us a call, and learn how to support healthy infant/toddler social emotional development!

HELPFUL LINKS

Puzzles provides assistance to child care providers and programs that care for young children with challenging behaviors. This is a free service to child care providers and programs within Region 4. The Promoting Healthy Social Behaviors project was designed to assist child care providers in meeting the needs of young children with challenging behaviors. The Behavior Specialist can:

  • Provide specialized consultation, technical assistance and training to help teachers identify, prevent and address challenging behaviors in young children
  • Share techniques that promote social competences in all children in child care
  • Help providers determine strategies to teach children socially appropriate behaviors
  • Work with providers to enhance classroom management techniques and promote child-centered learning activities that promote pro social behaviors

Research says that social-emotional skills are directly related to school success. Children are more likely to be successful in school if they:

  • Can identify emotions in themselves and others
  • Can relate to adults and peers in positive ways
  • Can manage anger, frustration and distress
  • Enjoy learning and approach it with enthusiasm

Children are less likely to be successful in school if they:

  • Are frequently aggressive
  • Engage in oppositional behavior
  • Constantly seek attention
  • Are unable to control their impulsive behavior
  • Are unable to cooperate with others
  • Ignore peers and adults

HELPFUL LINKS

SCHOOL-AGE IMPROVEMENT

The school-age project recognizes the need to provide services for school-age caregivers and works to improve the quality of care they provide. The School-age Specialist can provide:

  • On-site consultation
  • Workshops on school-age related topics
  • Provide Basic School-age Care Training (BSAC) training
  • Provide School-age Care Environment Rating Scale (SACERS) Training
  • Provide room arrangement and lesson plan suggestions
  • Provide assistance in increasing the quality of your school-age program
  • For more information, contact Mary Miller, School-age Specialist.

HELPFUL LINKS

REGISTRATION POLICIES AND PROCEDURES

Pre-­registration is required for all trainings, unless otherwise indicated.

  • Registration requires (3) three business days prior to the scheduled event.
  • All checks should be made to Southeastern Community College.
  • Training cost will be $5.00 per contact hour, unless otherwise indicated on training calendar or announcement.
  • No refunds will be provided for no-shows. The registration amount paid will be considered a donation for the cost of printing and staff preparation time.
  • No training credits will be given to individuals arriving 15 minutes or later for start time of training.
  • Twenty-four (24) hours cancellation notice is required to receive a training credit transfer to another training. No refunds will be provided.
  • A minimum of 10 spaces must be filled before training will be conducted. If this number is not reached, Region 4 reserves the right to cancel and participants will be notified and a full refund will be issued or transferred to another date. Participants will be notified by phone and email of training cancellations.
  • Region Trainings will follow the local County School Systems cancellation for inclement weather.
  • Training sessions will be closed 15 minutes after the start time. Late entry will not be permitted.
  • Participants will be provided with a sealed certificate. If additional certificates are requested at later dates, a charge of $5.00 will be required for staff time for verification and reissuing of certificates.
  • If unprofessional, disruptive or rude behavior continues, you will be asked to leave and no credit hours will be given.
  • We ask that participants be respectful to both presenters and other participants and turn off all cell phones during the training event.

Contact

Mailing Address

Southeastern Community College CCR&R
P.O. Box 151
Whiteville, NC 28472
Email: ccrr.region4@21enjoy.com
Website: www.puzzlesregion.com
Fax: (910) 642-5658
Telephone: 800-653-5212 or (910) 642-8189